Unstick a LinkStation Disk Backup

Imagine this… you have two decent network attach storage boxes which regularly backup one to the other using a built in Disk Backup tool –  Brilliant huh, sounds almost like a nerdy dream! Now imagine part way through a backup you get a power cut or you just trip over the power cable ripping the plug out the wall… not to worry, things will pick up where they left off… unless those decent boxes are Buffalo LinkStations!

I first discovered this flaw a few weeks back when one of my nightly backups seemed to be taking longer than usual. I gave the box about a day or so to try and fix itself but it still kept saying that the disk backup was in progress and in the admin interface and I was unable to cancel or remove the backup, so it was pretty much stuck as you can see below:

stuck-backup

I headed to the official Buffalo support website which seemed to have a fix for this common problem – See for yourself below:

buffalo-stuck-disk-backup
Okay so you have to restore the box to factory defaults… no thanks! I can only assume that because the HS-DHGL is one of their older discontinued products they just can’t be bothered to make a firmware update as it’s not worth their time or effort, but the other option is to use SSH to edit a file which will force the backup to complete.

Getting Unstuck

The following guide will assume you have already enabled SSH and are logged in ready to go, if you haven’t yet enabled SSH see this post here.

  • First of all we need to locate the backup configuration file and this depends on the job number specified on the admin interface, in my case it was number 1 so we need to type in the following command to open the file in a text editor:
    • "vi /etc/melco/backup1"
  • You will now see the configuration file open, hit I (for indigo) on your keyboard to allow inserting of new text and change the line status=running to status=done
  • Hit the Escape key and then type :wq to save your changes and quit
  • Head back to the admin interface to the Disk Backup section and you’ll now see the backup showing as complete as seen below:
    job-complete
  • That’s it – The backup is unstuck, and we haven’t had to restore anything to factory defaults!

Notes

  • This has been tried and tested on the following models/firmware: HS-DHGL/v2.1
  • Finally, if you could let me know if you encounter any problems or can confirm if this works for other models I’d be grateful

Incoming search terms:

  • live drive backup stuck

Fix TRENDnet TV-IP310pi Corroded PoE Connector

Following Storm Doris back in February 2017, one of my cameras at the back of my house stopped working. Part of the roof had been blown off (only a plastic cover, thankfully nothing more serious) which exposed the cable and allowed things to get a little damp.

On closer inspection the 3 far pins in the connector had corroded as seen below, click any picture below to see a bigger version:

I’m presuming the corrosion had been going on some time and the storm was the icing on the cake. I tried a mixture of WD40 contact cleaner followed by a strong acid based electrical cleaner and the pins had cleaned up nicely but it still wasn’t working.

I was really trying to avoid was chopping the connector off completely as after all it is over £100 worth of camera, but that happened…

As you can see from above I opted for jelly crimps (scotch locks) as these are waterproof, the alternative was either a  surface mounted punch-down box or RJ45 coupler both which would have corroded over time and eventually left me with a broken camera again.

After making sure everything was working I wrapped the jellys in a fair amount of electric tape followed by a healthy dose of vaseline.

I would have exposed more of the camera cable which would have made things look neater and given me more room to position each jelly connector but ultimately I wanted to cut as little as possible, and the fact it was now working again was a good enough excuse to leave it alone!

Colour Combinations

It came as no suprise that the camera didn’t use standard 568B colours but here is the combination I used:

Key: 568B Standard Cable / TRENDnet Cable

  • Orange WhiteOrange
  • OrangeYellow
  • Green WhiteGreen
  • BlueGrey
  • Blue WhitePurple
  • GreenBlue
  • Brown WhiteBrown
  • BrownWhite

I found the colours by refering to this guide here. I did manage to get the green and green white cables mixed up, however this hasn’t affected the camera in any way that I can tell. If it does ever cause a problem I will swap the cables around at the patch panel to avoid having to tamper any further.

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Setup your own live pet webcam for free using Yawcam

I’ve been experimenting for a while with different ways to stream live to the Internet from webcams, IP cameras and capture cards for the Coop Cam project, here is a basic guide on how to setup a simple live stream using a basic webcam.

What is required?

You will need a couple of things, including:

  • A computer with a webcam
  • An Internet connection with decent upload speed
  • Router access to port forward

Software

To create the stream we will use a free piece of opensource software called Yawcam, you can download it directly from here or learn more about the software here.

Installation is pretty simple, download and launch the installer then follow the on screen instructions.

Configuration

After the installation has finished open your newly installed software, you will see a screen like below:

1

The first thing we need to do is set the stream type, to do this go to Settings > Edit Settings…

2

Under Output select Stream and change the Stream type to MJPEG and hit OK

3

Next we need to select your webcam, head to Settings > Device > Change to and select your webcam from the list

4

Finally, back on the main screen hit enable on the Stream option – we are ready to go!

5

Previewing your stream

Here is the exciting part, previewing your live stream! On the same computer open up your browser and head to http://127.0.0.1:8081/video.mjpg

If everything is configured correctly you should see your webcam displayed live.

Here is my example of Spirit our pet quail:



What next?

The next thing you need to do is configure port forwarding in your router to allow people to connect in and view  your stream. I can’t really go into specific detail as there are many different types of router with different configuration options but basically what you want to do is forward port 8081 to your computer so anyone that connects to your-public-ip:8081/video.mjpg can see your stream.

You will also want to make sure that your computer has a static IP address or DHCP reservation to make sure the local IP address doesn’t change.

If you need help with that part let me know and I’ll give you a hand.

Will my Internet connection be able to cope?

This depends entirely on your upload speed, by default Yawcam only allows 10 concurrent connections.

For added security and to take the strain off your Internet connection I can relay your stream via Coop Cam’s powerful relay servers. They are able to take the single stream from your camera and amplify it allowing hundreds of users to connect at once.

The upside to this is that you will only have one connection being uploaded to the relay server, the server then handles everything else and even hides your public IP address – If you would like to know more please get in touch.

Notes

  • If you want Yawcam to start streaming automatically when you login to your computer then head to Settings > Edit Settings… > Startup and tick Start Stream output
  • You can check that port forwarding has been setup correctly by using the NerdTools Port Scanner, if it isn’t working double check your firewall settings
  • If your Internet connection has a dynamic IP address you’ll want to look into a Dynamic DNS service

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Encrypted AES VPN tunnel between pfSense 2.3 and Ubiquiti EdgeRouter Lite

I recently retired my Draytek 2830 following a serious security flaw I discovered (that’s another post, stay tuned!) and took the plunge with a rather impressive looking Ubiquiti EdgeRouter Lite.

The other option was a rack mountable TP-Link TL-ER6020 although the maximum NAT throughput was only 180Mbps and it only had 128MB  DDR2 memory and no clear CPU specs, also the web interface looked tired and very restricted. Pound for pound the EdgeRouter was cheaper and has a better spec of anywhere up to and over 600Mbps, 512MB DDR2 memory and Dual‑Core 500 MHz, although it wasn’t rack mountable it was a no brainer with its modern web interface, also did I mention it can process 1 million packets per second?

The EdgeRouter also appeals to my inner nerd  (you can no doubt tell) as you can program it via web interface, command line or console connection and you can remove features you don’t need to boost performance. For example, it may only have 3 gigabit ports, but you can do whatever you like with them! In my case I have it configured as 1 WAN port and the other 2 ports are linked to two seperate LAN’s. I will write a full review when I get chance, but for now just take my word that it is the best router I have ever owned.

Anyway, to business!

Home Network

As before with the Draytek guide my home network is still double NAT’d but there isn’t a speed issue anymore. I do plan to eventually run everything via the EdgeRouter but first I need to install a few additional access points (I’m thinking a couple of airGateway-LR’s hidden in roof spaces will do, powered by PoE obviously!).

In the example below the home network subnet will be 192.168.100.x
and WAN address will be 1.2.3.4

Remote Network

The remote network is the same as before too – a pfSense machine sits at x.1 and deals with traffic to the local network.

In the example below the remote subnet will be 192.168.150.x and WAN address will be 5.6.7.8

Important

  • Each local area network must be on a seperate subnet, otherwise things can quickly get messy and conflict!
  • Make sure you use a secure pre-shared key, anything above 32 characters will do nicely and under no circumstances use the example key!
  • The example details below are fake, replace them with your own details if you want this to work

Configuring pfSense

The guide below lists only the parts you need to change, if the option isn’t listed then leave it as is. Anything to do with double NATing is in red, ignore this if your router is WAN facing.

Fairly straight forward, go to VPN > IPSec > Click Add P1

  • Enter the Remote Gateway as the WAN IP address of the EdgeRouter (or the Superhub in my case) 1.2.3.4
  • Enter a brieft description in the Description box – VPN to pfSense LAN
  • Select Peer identifer as KeyID tag then enter the WAN address of EdgeRouter (192.168.100.1) else leave as Peer IP address
  • Enter your pre-shared key in the Pre-Shared Key box – testing123
  • Set the DH Group to 14
  • Press Save

That’s your Phase 1 entry configured, now for Phase 2:

Go to VPN > IPSec > Click on Show Phase 2 Entries for Home

  • Enter Remote Network as the home network subnet – 192.168.100.0/24
  • Put a brief description in the Description box – Home
  • Set PSF Key Group to 14
  • Press Save and then hit Apply Changes

Finally, we need to create a firewall rule to allow traffic to pass over the VPN:

  • Go to Firewall > Rules > IPSec and click Add
  • Change Protocol to any
  • Enter a brief description in the Description box – Allow VPN Traffic
  • Press Save any hit Apply Changes

Configuring the EdgeRouter

First of all make sure you are running the latest firmware otherwise options may be missing and this may not go smoothly! Currently (March 2017) I’m running EdgeRouter Lite v1.9.1.

Configuring the EdgeRouter is pretty straight forward, you don’t need to do anything via command line or console (unless you really want to, knock yourself out!) – Go to VPN > IPSec Site-to-Site

  • First tick the box Show advanced options to show the encryption options
  • Under Global Options leave Automatically open firewall and exclude from NAT unless you want greater control over who can connect in
  • Under Site-to-site peers enter the Peer as the home WAN address – 5.6.7.8
  • Put a brief description in the Description box – Remote
  • In local IP enter any
  • For Encryption set AES-256
  • In Pre-shared secret enter the key set previously – testing123
  • Enter the Local subnet as 192.168.100.0/24
  • Enter the Remote subnet as 192.168.150.0/24

All being well you should end up with something like below:

Once everything is saved, head over to the pfSense IPSec Status page and hit connect if it hasn’t already established and  there you have it!

At this point you may be asking why did you uncheck the option to Automatically open firewall…, this is because I like to have greater control over what IP addresses are allowed access to my network.

To substitute this option I created a rule in the NAT section translating UDP port 4500 to the routers local IP address (192.168.100.1). In turn I set the Src Address Group of this rule to a list of predefined IP addresses, thus only allowing access to my networks and blocking the rest of the world.

 

 

 

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Remove Adverts from All 4 Roku App

Disclaimer

This post is for educational purposes only, it briefly describes a technique for removing the adverts from Channel 4’s on demand service. I won’t be providing any working examples and won’t be held liable whatever the outcome if you try this, this was just setup as a test one afternoon and then destroyed shortly after. Do so at your own risk.

Why even bother?

Now I love TV but I always end up forgetting and then having to catch up later using on demand services via my NowTV box, some services are great – like the BBC iPlayer – where as others – 4OD or All 4 – lack basic features like being able to resume where you left off without having to sit through the ads again.

This got me thinking, is it possible to get around the ads? Picture this… you are watching an hour long programme on your Roku (or NowTV) box, you have 10 minutes to go and you have to nip out. You come back hoping to pick up where you left off.. but oh no, something happened and now you have to watch from the begining OR fast forward until you get to an ad break, watch the ads, then fast forward again… its not good right? This has happened to me many a time!

A quick Google suggested this is not possible, but that wasn’t good enough for me.

How did you get it to work?

It took a bit of nerdy know how, a decent router and a publicly accessible Linux box.

Decent router – I was using a NowTV (watered down Roku) box, these don’t have the option to manually specify the DNS server addresses so you have to set the DNS servers in my router

Linux box – I used a CentOS 7 box running BIND and Apache, BIND responded to the DNS requests aiming everything at the Apache server

The basic idea is to redirect any requests to ‘known advertiser servers’ to your own server which is returning a single pixel instead of the advertisers video, and it did work really well:

As you can see above the same programme has ads and one does not. This method also removes the ad cue points so you are literally just served with the entire video – cool, huh?

Notes

  • This was just a test, please don’t lecture me about the importance of advertising and the revenue it generates
  • I only tested it with the Roku app, although I think it would have worked for the Xbox app too
  • I guess the same tecnique could be used to create a ‘super’ ad blocker that works with more than just on demand services

Incoming search terms:

  • roku remove ads

Enable SSH on LinkStation Stock Firmware

Enabling SSH on the LinkStation is simpler than you might think and opens up a world of functionality (and nerdyness) that you never had before – All this with no firmware flashing which ultimately means no data loss and no risk of bricking your box.

My motivation to enable SSH came about when my older LinkStation (a 500GB HS-DHGL) was doing a Disk Backup to my newer one (a 2TB LS-WXL) and it just seemed to be taking forever. It turned out the backup had hung part way through and the only official way to fix this problem as listed on Buffalo’s support website was to reset the box back to factory settings – That’s a bit ridiculous in my opinion but there is a work around, see this post here for more information on how to unstick a backup.

The activation process is done by a program called ACP Commander which is a command line tool that can be a little confusing to work at times with its lack of user friendly interface (if you search for this online you’ll see what I mean) however by chance I came across a reworked version that has a decent interface and is fairly easy to use.

Enabling SSH

The following guide will assume that you are on the same network as your LinkStation and are able to access it freely as you normally would day-to-day,  also if you want to keep your warranty with Buffalo do not continue!

  • Download ACP Commander GUI for Windows (.EXE file)
  • Run your newly downloaded file and you should see a screen similar to the one below:
    lsunlock-1
  • Select your LinkStation IP address from where it says Select LinkStation, then enter your password where it says Admin password and press Enable SSH
  • After a couple of seconds you will be shown a SSH enabled OK! message as seen below:
    lsunlock-2
  • The next step is to set your root password for SSH, click Set root PW, type in a password and then press OK and you will see another message like the one below:
    lsunlock-4
  • Now head to your favourite SSH software and connect to your box! If all is well you will see something similar to this:
    lsunlock-5
  • That’s all you need to do to enable SSH!

Notes

  • This method is proven to work on both Windows and Mac for the following models/firmware: LS-WXL/v1.68, HS-DHGL/v2.11, LS-QVL/v1.64
  • Common out of the box commands include: top – process viewer, vi – text editor, cp – copy files, mv – move files
  • Mine and my friends newer LinkStations had HTOP installed – Epic!
  • Enabling SSH will no doubt void your warranty with Buffalo but who needs that anyway?!
  • I didn’t create the program recommended and take no credit for it
  • Finally, if you could let me know if you encounter any problems or can confirm if this works for other models I’d be grateful
  • Thanks to Callum for confirming this works on the LS-QVL and Michael for confirming this works on the TS-X/R5 with version 1.66 firmware

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Virtualmin GPL on CentOS 5.8

Update: 08/03/2017: The following guide was originally written many moons ago for installing the Virtualmin GPL (free) control panel on CentOS 5.8 x86, however it will work exactly the same on the current version of CentOS (7.0).

The following guide will assume you are logged into your CentOS machine via command line, ready to enter the following commands.

First you will want select a temporary directory to Virtualmin installation file to. We will only use the downloaded file once so it’s pointless keeping it, so to free up space and put it in /tmp!

cd /tmp

Download the Virtualmin GPL installer:

wget http://software.virtualmin.com/gpl/scripts/install.sh

Run the installer:

sh install.sh

The installer will then launch and prompt you to approve if you’d like to proceed. Simply type “y” and press enter and the installation process will begin.

After a short while you will see a message saying the installation has been completed. You will then be able to login to installation of Virtualmin by heading to https://hostname-or-ipaddress:10000 using the root username and password.

Once logged in you will then be guided through a final configuration process, once completed the installation will be complete and ready for use. Another guide will be written soon to explain how to configure Virtualmin.

Notes

  • If you don’t already have a server to try this on check out DigitalOcean, they offer reliable good spec servers starting from $5 a month
  • Depending on your CentOS installation you may get an error message about the Perl package being missing. To resolve this run the following command in terminal and then relaunch the installer:
    • yum install perl -y

Incoming search terms:

  • InstallArchives|NerdKey