Windows 10 Automatic Login at Boot or Switch of User

There may come a time in your nerdy life where you want your computer to automatically log in at boot or whenever anybody signs out, this can be especially useful if you are running software that needs a user to be constantly logged in.

For example, I run CCTV software on my computer via a user called Console, the software displays live camera feeds on a second screen at my desk, the same signal is fed via a splitter through network cables eventually reaching various screens dotted around my house.

The setup requires my Console user to be constantly logged in, be it when the system boots or after I have finished checking my emails or being nerdy.

It is fairly straight forward to get going, in my case on Windows 10 Pro I ran the built-in netplwiz(.exe) utility and added one string value to the registry.

Part 1: Configuring automatic login at boot

  1. Run netplwiz(.exe) and uncheck the box saying Users must enter a username and password to use this computer.
  2. Press OK then enter the username and password you want the computer to automatically login as and press OK again

That’s the first part completed, so now whenever you boot your computer it will automatically sign in as the user account you have set.

Part 2: Configure automatic login when signing out/switching user

The next part involves adding a regsitry key with a string value, once this was done I found it worked straight away without having to reboot my machine.

  1. Open regedit(.exe) and navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Winlogon

    Right click on Winlogon and select New > String Value

  2. For the value name enter ForceAutoLogon, double click the line you just added and enter the  value date to 1

That’s it! Now when you sign out it will automatically sign back in to the user account set in first step.

Notes

  • If you want to log in as a different user, hold the shift key whilst locking your account, you’ll then see the normal Windows login screen
  • You can do step 1 via the registry if you want, but why over complicate things!

Webmin 1.610 on CentOS 5.8 (x86)

The following commands can be used to install Webmin 1.610 on CentOS 5.8. Make sure you’re logged in as root and then follow the steps below.

Select a temporary directory to save the download to. We will only use the downloaded file once so it’s pointless keeping it.. free up space and put it in /tmp!

cd /tmp

Begin the download of Webmin using wget:

wget http://prdownloads.sourceforge.net/webadmin/webmin-1.610-1.noarch.rpm

Install Webmin by unpacking the archive:

rpm -Uvh webmin-1.610-1.noarch.rpm

Done! You can now login to your fresh installation of Webmin by heading to http://hostname-or-ipaddress:10000 using the root username and password.

Notes

  • If you don’t have a server to try this on I’d recommend DigitalOcean hands down – virtual servers start from $5 a month

Encrypted AES VPN tunnel between pfSense 2.3 and Draytek 2830

For a long time now I’ve managed several VMware ESXi servers and for easy management I’ve created a local area network on each making backups, monitoring and the usual sysad tasks a breeze.

The icing on the cake is that I recently swapped from m0n0walll to pfSense and went about setting up a lan to lan VPN tunnel to my home network, so now I can access everything locally as if I was on the same network.

Home Network

My home network uses a Draytek 2830 connected to a Virgin Media Superhub. Unfortunatley the Draytek is getting on a little bit now and doesn’t have the processing power to deal with my 100mbit connection speed, so I’ve had to double NAT the network using the Superhub in router mode and then DMZ everything towards the Draytek.

This isn’t a bad thing though as all the “dumb” wireless devices (mobile phones, Roku’s, Nest thermostat, etc) connect direct to the Superhub whilst my home server and everything crucial connect via the Draytek. All in all I get 70mbit through the Draytek on average and there’s plenty of bandwidth left for the devices connected to the Superhub.

In the example below the home network subnet will be 192.168.100.x

Remote Network

The remote network is pretty simple, they are all setup the same apart from x is a different number based on the virtual host name – a pfSense machine sits at x.1 and deals with traffic to the local network.

In the example below the remote subnet will be 192.168.150.x

Important

  • Each local area network must be on a seperate subnet, otherwise things can quickly get messy and conflict!
  • Make sure you use a secure pre-shared key, anything above 32 characters will do nicely
  • The example details below are fake, replace them with your own details if you want this to work

Configuring pfSense

The guide below lists only the parts you need to change, if the option isn’t listed then leave it as is

Fairly straight forward, go to VPN > IPSec > Click Add P1

  • Enter the Remote Gateway as the WAN IP address of the Draytek (or the Superhub in my case)
  • Enter a brieft description in the Description box
  • If you are double NAT’d like me select Peer identifer as KeyID tag then enter the WAN2 address of Draytek else leave as Peer IP address
  • Enter your pre-shared key in the Pre-Shared Key box
  • Press Save

That’s your Phase 1 entry configured, now for Phase 2:

Go to VPN > IPSec > Click on Show Phase 2 Entries for Home

  • Enter Remote Network as the home network subnet – 192.168.100.0/24
  • Put a brief description in the Description box
  • Set PSF Key Group to 2
  • Press Save and then hit Apply Changes

Finally, we need to create a firewall rule to allow traffic to pass over the VPN:

  • Go to Firewall > Rules > IPSec and click Add
  • Change Protocol to any
  • Enter a brief description in the Description box
  • Press Save any hit Apply Changes

Configuring the Draytek

Now it is time to configure the Draytek – Go to VPN and Remote Access > LAN to LAN

For Common Settings:

  • Enter a Profile Name
  • Tick Enable this profile
  • Make sure Call Direction is set to Both

For Dial-Out Settings:

  • Set type of server to IPSec Tunnel
  • Enter the Remote WAN IP in the Server IP/Hostname for VPN box
  • Enter the pre-shared key set previously in the Pre-Shared Key box
  • For IPSec Security Method set it to High (ESP)AES with Authentication
  • Under Advanced set IKE phase 1 propsal to AES256_SHa1-G14 and IKE phase 2 proposal to AES256_SHA1 then press OK

For Dial-In Settings:

  • Set the Allowed Dial-In Type to IPSec Tunnel
  • Tick the box to Specify Remote VPN Gateway and enter the remote network WAN IP
  • Enter the pre-shared key set previously in the Pre-Shared Key box
  • For IPSec Security Method untick all apart from High (ESP) – AES

Under TCP/IP Netowrk Settings:

  • Set Remote Network IP as the remote network subnet – 192.168.150.0

Hit OK at the very bottom to save the profile, leave it a few seconds and it should connect. If it doesn’t connect automatically, head to the IPSec Status page in pfSense and hit Connect manually

Server Security Tips

Whenever I deploy a new server I always ensure that any flaws which I’ve picked up from my few years of server experience are fixed, leaving the new server as secure as can be and ready for use.

Below are a few tips for keeping your server as secure as can be:

  • Have a secure root password – Use something random and at least 8 characters long
  • Use non-default ports – Change the default port for services commonly targeted by bots or attackers such as SSH
  • Check your logs – Look for authentication failures and put the related IPs in a block or reject rule using iptables
  • Process users – Make sure processes have their own users and aren’t ran as root

More tips will be added once I remember them!

Connect Directly to SunLuxy Camera Streams

For a while now I’ve used a cheap SunLuxy H.264 DVR as the heart of the CoopCam project and initially couldn’t get a direct link to the camera stream so had to screen captured the bog standard web interface using VLC and break the feed down into separate streams but recently after a fair bit of trial and error I discovered a much easier solution!

I had researched on and off for months, went through masses of trial and error with various software and ultimately found no solution but after being inspired again I headed to the DVR’s web interface to start from scratch. I stumbled across source code in a file called /js/view2.js that constructs an RTMP:// address to show live camera feeds through the web interfaces flash player – See snippet of code below:

dvr_viewer.ConnectRTMP(index, "rtmp://" + location.host, "ch" + index + "_" + (dvr_type=="main"?"0":"1") + ".264");

After removing the jargon the link came out as rtmp://dvraddress:port/ch#_#.264 with the first number being the channel you want to connect to (starting at 0) and the second being the stream (substream being 1 and main being 0)

I headed to VLC player, selected Open Network Stream and entered the following:

rtmp://192.168.0.100:81/ch0_0.264

Broken down you can see my DVR is on the local network as 192.168.0.100 at port 81  and that I wanted to view channel 1’s main stream, low and behold after a few seconds the camera started to play!

Notes

  • To convert the stream to something more useful you could use rtmpdump and ffmpeg on Linux systems – I’ll write another guide about that shortly
  • If you do something wrong and overload the DVR then you’ll hear a beep as the box reboots
  • If this works for you please comment your DVR make and model

TRENDnet TV-IP310pi Night Vision Fix

Let’s face it, it’s not fun when things don’t work properly which is why I was a little annoyed recently – very big understatment! – when I discovered my TRENDnet TV-IP310pi cameras had a slight flaw, a flaw which is scarcely documented but fairly fundemental to the overall use of the camera… oh and did I forget to mention I own 5 of these cameras, all installed around my house, all which had the same problem? Yup!

So what is the actual problem?

Well the cameras work perfectly in the day delivering 25 frames per second of crisp 1080p footage which is great BUT when the night time comes – as it does – performance takes a dramatic hit and you are lucky to get a maximum of 4 frames per second… which is pretty rubbish! For months I’ve been thinking it  was a problem with my home server – an Intel I7 920 quad core 2.4GHz  running VMware – and I came to the conclusion that I needed a new rig as it just couldn’t cope with the amount of data passing thrdropough but oh was I wrong!

Anyway, long story short after pestering my friend Chris at work – who also runs his own CCTV system, only with the identical Hikvision DS-2CD2032F-I cameras – some extensive testing was done – I’ll spare you the details – but we came to the conclusion that the hardware was good, the network was good and were stumped until we found an Amazon review which also mentioned the same problem!

This unfortunatley opened up a can of worms and what followed was a very stressful 3 days which involved not sleeping much, scouring forums, downloading all sorts of firmware and almost losing ALL hope and contacting support! However, I’m very pleased to report that all of my cameras are now running the latest TRENDnet firmware – v5.3.4 – and are delivering 25 FPS 1080p footage at night time – Wow!

So how easy is it to fix?

The fix is easier than you might think, but you do need to be brave as we are essentially going to ‘brick’ the camera and make it an expensive paper weight by installing the Hikvision firmware, then we will reload the TRENDnet firmware fresh and enjoy ALL the frames per second! You might think this is a mad idea, but the TRENDnet TV-IP310pi is actually a rebranded version of the Hikvision DS-2CD2032F-I, so deep down the hardware is the same it just has a different sticker on the side.

I used the following files found below, combined with an XP laptop that was connected by cable directly to the PoE switch, this was connected to the camera directly and ideally  you’ll want to unplug all other devices so you only have the camera and the laptop plugged in but I might have got a bit lazy towards the end… Also, my Windows 7 laptop struggled to transfer the firmware as the TFTP file transfer kept looping and wouldn’t complete, hence using an old XP machine.

I’m up for the challenge!

Great! Before you continue please be aware that I won’t be liable if this goes wrong and it will reset your camera back to the factory default settings! I’ve done this process 5 times flawlessly so far but still – proceed at your own risk!

Whenever the camera boots it scans a predefined IP for a TFTP server, if it finds this server it looks for a specific file and because of this we can do the recovery without having to open the camera up or get ‘hands on’! I reflashed all my cameras with them still fixed in position on the house, minimal effort required!

Update 24/03/2017 –

I can confirm the same process below works on Windows 10 Pro, the firewall had to be switched off but that was all – 79 seconds from start to finish!

  1. Download the files found here, extract them somewhere safe and keep reading
  2. Change your computers network settings so the IP address is 192.0.0.128, see picture below:
    trendnet_tv-ip310pi_recovery-network-config
  3. Connect your computer to the switch along with the camera, disable any other connections network – FLASH VIA ETHERNET CABLE ONLY!
  4. Copy the Hikvision_5-1-6–digicap.dav file into the TFTP Server folder and rename it digicap.dav
  5. Run tftpserv.exe and then restart your camera, after a few seconds you should see the following:
    trendnet_tv-ip310pi_recovery-tftp1
  6. Now you won’t get any confirmation here, so leave it 2 or 3 minutes then unplug your camera, close the tftpserv.exe and repeat step 3 but this time use the Trendnet_5-3-4–digicap.dav file
  7. Now start tftpserv.exe again and connect your IP camera, this time after a few minutes you’ll see a system update complete message like below:
    trendnet_tv-ip310pi_recovery-tftp2
  8. Close of tftpserv.exe and reboot the camera, after a few minutes check your router and you’ll have a fresh IP camera sat on DHCP waiting be configured! If you can’t find your camera straight away, don’t panic! Install the auto discovery program (SADPTool_V3.0.0.100.exe) and find the camera that way

Conclusion

I did try updating to the latest TRENDnet firmware via the web interface before going down the TFTP route but it still gave me low frames per second at night using the identical 5.3.4 file… I’m guessing installing the Hikvision firmware first completely screwed things up, after that the camera is left fresh, ready for the TRENDnet firmware? Either way it worked and I’m a happy nerd!

Notes

  • Again, I can’t be liable if this goes wrong for you!
  • The files in the link above were all found on the Internet, I take no credit, all  credit belongs to the respective authors (presuming that is Hikvision? Thanks!)
  • If you get really stuck I can reflash your cameras, after all not everyone has an old XP relic lying around! Drop me an email, pay for postage and send your camera in a box along with a little gift!
  • I found an easy way to tell the camera state during the reflashing process which is to do a constant ping to the IP addresses below – Note that in order to use this method you’ll need to assign your network card two IP addresses (192.0.0.128 and 192.168.1.128):
    • 192.0.0.64 – Camera is in rescue mode
    • 192.168.1.64 – Camera firmware has updated but not yet rebooted
    • No response from either – Somethings not right!
  • You can find the latest TRENDnet firmware direct from their website here
  • From various forum posts I read some people were saying you can flash using any TFTP server software, however this isn’t the case as you must use the Hikvision TFTP server as there is a special initiation process which waits for certain key to be sent back and forward before the firmware updating process begins
  • Make sure you clear your browser cache before logging in again otherwise things might not work properly
  • The default user/password combination is admin/admin